Dakota Trails - North Dakota Outdoor Sports

Boat North Dakota Course

Boat owners are reminded that children ages 12-15 who want to operate a boat or personal watercraft alone this summer must first take the state’s boating basics course.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department education coordinator Brian Schaffer recommends all boaters take a boater education course, however state law requires only youngsters ages 12-15 must pass the course before they operate a boat or personal watercraft with at least a 10 horsepower motor by themselves. In addition, some insurance companies give adult boat owners who pass the course a discount on boat insurance.

The course is available for home-study from the Game and Fish Department’s Bismarck office. Two commercial providers also offer the course online, and links to those sites are found on the department’s website at gf.nd.gov.

While the home-study course is free, students will be charged a fee to take it online. The online provider charges for the course, not the Game and Fish Department. The fee stays with the online provider.

Upon completion of the online test, and providing a credit card number, students will be able to print out a temporary certification card, and within 10 days a permanent card will be mailed.

The course covers legal requirements, navigation rules, getting underway, accidents and special topics such as weather, rules of the road, laws, life saving and first aid.

For more information contact Schaffer by email at ndgf@nd.gov; or call 701-328-6300.

Boat North Dakota Course

Boat owners are reminded that children ages 12-15 who want to operate a boat or personal watercraft alone this summer must first take the state’s boating basics course.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department education coordinator Brian Schaffer recommends all boaters take a boater education course, however state law requires that only youngsters ages 12-15 must pass the course before they operate a boat or personal watercraft with at least a 10 horsepower motor by themselves. In addition, some insurance companies give adult boat owners who pass the course a discount on boat insurance.

The course is available for home-study from the Game and Fish Department’s Bismarck office. Two commercial providers also offer the course online, and links to those sites are found on the department’s website at gf.nd.gov.

While the home-study course is free, students will be charged a fee to take it online. The online provider charges for the course, not the Game and Fish Department. The fee stays with the online provider.

Upon completion of the online test, and providing a credit card number, students will be able to print out a temporary certification card, and within 10 days a permanent card will be mailed.

The course covers legal requirements, navigation rules, getting underway, accidents and special topics such as weather, rules of the road, laws, life saving and first aid.

For more information contact Schaffer by email at ndgf@nd.gov; or call 701-328-6300.

Have You Seen? Operation Dry Water

 

 

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is participating in “Operation Dry Water,” a nationwide effort aimed at reducing boating while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Learn more in this week’s webcast with game warden Jackie Lundstrom.The video is here or ://gf.nd.gov/publications/television/outdoors-online-webcast.

​And if you’ve ever considered a career as a game warden, or have a friend, neighbor, son or daughter with an interest, the next game warden exam isAugust 5. Full details available right here.​ or here: http://gf.nd.gov/news/game-warden-exam-set-aug-5

May Highlights Safe Boating

May Highlights Safe Boating

A public awareness campaign held annually in May emphasizes the need for boaters to wears life jackets.

Nancy Boldt, boat and water safety coordinator for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said the message reinforces the importance of personal flotation devices.

“Facts prove there is no safety substitute for wearing a life jacket while recreating on public waters,” Boldt said.

Failure to wear a PFD is the main reason people lose their lives in boating accidents. Boldt said each year, about 700 people nationwide die in boating-related accidents. Nearly 70 percent are caused by drowning, and eight of 10 victims were not wearing a life jacket.

North Dakota law requires Coast Guard approved PFDs in the following circumstances:

  • ·         On watercraft less than 16 feet in length, one wearable PFD must be on board for each person.
  • ·         Anyone being towed on water-skis, surfboard, or a similar device must wear a PFD.
  • ·         No person may operate or permit the operation of a personal watercraft without each person on board wearing a PFD.
  • ·         Watercraft of 16 feet or longer must have one wearable PFD for each person on board, and one throwable flotation device.
  • ·         On any vessel less than 27 feet in length, all persons 10 years of age or younger must wear a properly fastened, Coast Guard approved PFD.

Boaters are reminded to test life jackets for serviceability and fit. All straps and buckles must be intact and there should be no rips or tears in the fabric.