Dakota Trails - North Dakota Outdoor Sports

Order 2019 OUTDOORS Calendars

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is taking orders for its North Dakota OUTDOORS calendar, the source for all hunting season and application dates for 2019. Along with outstanding color photographs of North Dakota wildlife and scenery, it also includes sunrise-sunset times and moon phases.

 

To order online, visit buy and apply at the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov., or  send $3 for each, plus $1 postage, to: Calendar, North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501-5095. Be sure to include a three-line return address with your order, or the post office may not deliver our return mailing.

 

The calendar is the North Dakota OUTDOORS magazine’s December issue, so current subscribers will automatically receive it in the mail.

The 2018 May North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here.

 

Ron Wilson explains how the extended winter resulted in a Northern Pike Spawn Delayed

When North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries biologists set trap nets in Lake Oahe in spring for the northern pike spawn, they were as late to the game as they’d been in years.

 

Ron also authored the story on Deer Gun Applications go Electronic  A law passed by the North Dakota Legislature requiring the Department to develop an all-electronic licensing system, and phase out the old paper license books, actually went into effect April 1, 2016.

 

The North Dakota State Water Commission explains the history and transition of lowhead dams and how State Agencies Work Together To Eliminate “Drowning Machines”

 

One of the unintentional consequences that materialized is that these lowhead dams created dangerous conditions that recreational river users may not be aware of or may underestimate.

 

Have You Read? May ND Outdoors Magazine!

​The 2017 May North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here.

Outdoors editor Ron Wilson and Game and Fish communications supervisor Craig Bihrle have a great  read Sage Grouse Recovery Effort Underway with some great photographs.

In April, North Dakota Game and Fish personnel moved 60 sage grouse – 40 females and 20 males – from southern Wyoming to Bowman County. To keep tabs on the birds, all were marked with either GPS or VHF radio devices.The big upland birds have a fundamental link to the aromatic plant, big sage. Sagebrush is critical to sage grouse, as they rely on the plant for food for much of the year, cover from weather and predators, and nesting and brood habitat.

The reality, however, is about half of the big sage habitat in North Dakota has vanished from the landscape in the last half-century, but has remained stable for the last decade or more.

North Dakota Outdoors editor Ron Wilson wrote North Dakota’s Shorebird Connection

Of the 50 or so shorebird species that migrate through North America in spring, roughly 36 have ties to North Dakota. The link to this neck of the Northern Plains for the majority is brief, yet vital, as birds touch down to rest and refuel, before pointing their bills north and continuing on.

have you read? October North Dakota Outdoors Magazine

 

The 2016 October  issue of North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here.

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Ron Wilson provides writes on the status of one of our premier big game species the bighorn sheep population, “North Dakota Game and Fish Department officials cancelled the 2015 bighorn sheep hunting season in order to better understand the severity of a bacterial pneumonia outbreak on the population.

Up until that point, the state’s bighorn sheep hunting season in western North Dakota had run without pause for many years.

The full story is here: Assessment of Bighorn Population.

 

You’ll also want to be sure to check out a feature by Greg Freeman on the Avoiding Problems With Feral Pigs  “Casey Anderson, North Dakota Game and Fish Department assistant wildlife division chief, said seeing an apparent wild or feral pig is not as uncommon as you might think, as feral swine have been detected in North Dakota on numerous occasions since 2007. One of those occurred last fall.”

 

You’ll be sure to enjoy a look back in history In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act, or Duck Stamp Act, in an effort to stop the destruction of wetlands vital to the survival of migratory waterfowl. Under the act, all waterfowl hunters 16 and older must annually purchase and carry a stamp.

Since 1934, more than $800 million dollars has gone into that fund to protect millions of acres of habitat. Here’s the full story:  Migratory Bird Treaty Turns 100