Dakota Trails - North Dakota Outdoor Sports

CWD Surveillance Continues

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department will continue its Hunter-Harvested Surveillance program during the 2019 hunting season by sampling deer for chronic wasting disease from units in more than half of the state.

 

Samples from hunter-harvested deer taken in the eastern portion of the state will be tested from units 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F1, 2F2, 2G, 2G1, 2G2 and 2L. In addition, deer will be tested in the northwest from units 3A1, 3A2, 3A3 (that portion of the unit north of U.S. Highway 2) and 3B1, in the west from units 4B and 4C, and in the southwest from units 3C (the portion of the unit west of the Missouri River), 3E1, 3E2, 3F1 and 3F2.

 

Game and Fish wildlife veterinarian Dr. Charlie Bahnson said surveillance is conducted to estimate where CWD is located, and to determine the infection rate in the area. He said the department uses the information to guide its efforts in managing the impacts of the disease.

 

“CWD has not been found in the eastern third of the state and our surveillance goal in that area is to confidently say that it is still not present in the area,” Bahnson said. “We need to test a lot of deer to reach that conclusion, so it is important for hunters to consider dropping off their deer for testing.”

 

Bahnson mentioned it’s likely that additional positive deer will be found this fall in units 3A1, 3B1, 3F2 and 4B where CWD has been previously detected. “Infection rates are relatively low in those areas, but only a small portion of hunters have submitted heads for testing,” he added. “Most infected deer will look perfectly healthy and the only way to tell is by having them tested.”

 

Hunters are encouraged to drop off the head of an adult or yearling deer at one of nearly 100 collection sites across the state. Hunters wishing to keep the deer head can bring it to a Game and Fish district office during business hours to have it sampled. Fawns and head-shot deer cannot be tested. Testing results will be provided to hunters within 2-3 weeks by email or text message, based on their preferred communication method listed on their Game and Fish account. To add or update contact information, visit My Account at the department’s website, gf.nd.gov.

 

Hunters should note a carcass or head of a white-tailed deer or mule deer taken from deer hunting units 3A1, 3B1 or 3F2; a moose from moose hunting unit M10; or an elk from elk hunting unit E6; may not be transported to a collection site outside of the unit. Exceptions: deer heads taken in units 3A1 or 3B1 may be transported between those units, and moose heads taken in unit M10 may be delivered to the collection sites at the Williston Game and Fish office and at the North Dakota State Fair grounds in Minot.

 

More information on CWD, including transportation restrictions, is available at the Game and Fish website.

 

Hunters are encouraged to drop off deer heads at the following locations:

 

  • Alexander – Sather Lake Recreation Area
  • Beach – Gooseneck Implement
  • Belfield – Badlands Taxidermy, Superpumper
  • Bismarck – 3Be Meats, Game and Fish Department, West Dakota Meats
  • Blaisdell – BJ Taxidermy
  • Bottineau – Mattern Family Meats
  • Bowbells – The Joint
  • Cando – K&E Meats
  • Carrington – Barton Meats
  • Casselton – Casselton Tesoro
  • Cooperstown – Miller’s Fresh Foods, OCD Taxidermy
  • Crosby – Cenex/New Century Ag
  • Devils Lake – Lake Region Sportsmen’s Club/City Sanitation Department, Game and Fish Department
  • Dickinson – Game and Fish Department, Wildlife Creations
  • Dunseith – Wayne’s Food Pride
  • Edgeley – Cenex
  • Elgin – Gunny’s Bait and Tackle, Melvin’s Taxidermy
  • Ellendale – True Value
  • Enderlin – Maple Valley Lockers
  • Fargo – NDSU Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, Prime Cut Meats
  • Flasher – 8 miles east on N.D. Highway 21
  • Fordville – Jelinek Brother Taxidermy
  • Fort Yates – Prairie Knights Quik Mart
  • Glen Ullin – Kuntz’s Butcher Shop
  • Grafton – Tractor Supply
  • Grand Forks – Grand Forks Gun Club
  • Grassy Butte – Sweet Crude Travel Center
  • Great Bend – Manock Meats
  • Grenora – Farmer’s Union
  • Gwinner – Stoppleworth Taxidermy
  • Hettinger – Dakota Packing
  • Horace – J&K Taxidermy
  • Jamestown – Game and Fish Department, Windish’s Deer Processing
  • Kenmare – Farmer’s Union, Jessica Ware’s Taxidermy
  • Lakota – Zimprich Taxidermy
  • LaMoure – LaMoure Lockers
  • Langdon – Farmer’s Union Cenex, Hursman Taxidermy
  • Larimore – E-Z Stop Convenience Store
  • Linton – BP Taxidermy, Bosch’s Meat Market, Scherr’s Meats
  • Lisbon – Sheyenne National Grasslands Office
  • Mandan – Butcher Block Meats
  • Mapleton – Jason’s Taxidermy
  • Mayville – Cenex
  • Milnor – Milnor Locker
  • Minot – AAA Taxidermy, Blom’s Locker and Processing, Frenchy’s Taxidermy, State Fairgrounds, Wallen’s Taxidermy
  • Mohall – Engebretson Processing, Farmer’s Union
  • Mott – 4 Corners Car Wash
  • New Leipzig – Hertz Hardware, and 12 miles south on N.D. Highway 49
  • New Town – Three Affiliated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Office
  • New Rockford – Risovi Taxidermy Studio
  • Oakes – Butcher Block
  • Park River – Jim’s Super Valu
  • Powers Lake – Farmer’s Union
  • Ray – Horizon-Cenex
  • Reynolds – Weber’s Meats
  • Rolette – The Meat Shack
  • Rugby – Cenex
  • Scranton – Wolf’s Meat Processing
  • Selfridge – Cenex
  • Sheyenne – Wild Things Taxidermy
  • Solen – Hettich Salvage
  • Stanley – Ace Hardware
  • Tioga – Recycling Center
  • Valley City – Valley Meat Supply
  • Wahpeton – Aber Taxidermy, David’s Taxidermy, J&R Taxidermy
  • Walcott – Brantley’s Antlers
  • Walhalla – North Dakota Forest Service
  • Watford City – Farmer’s Union Cenex
  • West Fargo – West Fargo City Sanitation
  • Williston – Bickler Taxidermy, Dave’s Heads or Tails Taxidermy, Mounts By Mert, Game and Fish Department, Zerr’s Taxidermy

CWD Surveillance Continues

The state Game and Fish Department will continue its Hunter-Harvested Surveillance program during the 2017 deer hunting season, by sampling deer for chronic wasting disease and bovine tuberculosis from 10 units in North Dakota. In addition, all moose and elk harvested in the state are eligible for testing.

CWD testing

Samples from hunter-harvested deer taken in the central portion of the state will be tested from units 2H, 2I, 2J1, 2J2, 2K1, 2K2, 3A4, 3B3 and 3C. In addition, deer will be tested from unit 3F2 in the southwest.

Every head sampled must have either the deer tag attached, or a new tag can be filled out with the license number, deer hunting unit and date harvested.

Hunters are encouraged to drop off deer heads at the following locations:

  • Ashley – Ashley Super Valu Store
  • Bismarck – Game and Fish Department headquarters, Call of the Wild Taxidermy, 3Be Meats, West Dakota Meats
  • Bottineau – Mattern Family Meats
  • Carrington – Barton Meats
  • Devils Lake – Devils Lake Game and Fish district office
  • Dickinson – Dickinson Game and Fish district office
  • Ellendale – Oxenrider Motel
  • Granville – S&E Meats
  • Harvey – Lonetree Game and Fish district office
  • Heaton – Miller Game Processing
  • Jamestown – Jamestown Game and Fish district office
  • LaMoure – LaMoure Lockers
  • Linton – Bosch’s Meat Market, Scherr’s Meats
  • Mandan – Butcher Block Meats, Nevada’s Wildlife Designs
  • McClusky – Bentz Supply Store
  • Minot – Johnson Taxidermy
  • Moffit – Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge office
  • Parshall – Myers Meats and Specialties
  • Riverdale – Riverdale Game and Fish district office
  • Rolette – Meat Shack
  • Rugby – Cenex C Store
  • Sheyenne – Brenno Meats, Wild Things Taxidermy
  • Streeter – Reister Meats and Catering
  • Turtle Lake – Main Street Market
  • Upham – J. Clark Salyer NWR office
  • Washburn – Enerbase
  • Wilton – Cenex
  • Wing – Terry’s Sales and Service
  • Woodworth – Chase Lake NWR office.

Drop off locations for deer taken from unit 3F2:

  • Carson – Hertz Hardware
  • Elgin – Gunny’s Bait and Tackle, Melvin’s Taxidermy
  • Glen Ullin – Kuntz’s Butcher Shop
  • Hettinger – Dakota Packing
  • New Leipzig – Hertz Hardware

 

Moose and elk heads should be taken to a Game and Fish office.

CWD affects the nervous system of members of the deer family and is always fatal. Scientists have found no evidence that CWD can be transmitted naturally to humans or livestock.

Wildlife Feeding Concerns

photo by Craig Bihrle, ND    Game and Fish

 

North Dakota is experiencing winter conditions that have many citizens concerned about stress on wildlife.

Kevin Kading, private land section leader for the State Game and Fish Department, said harsh winters often generate conversations and questions about feeding wildlife, particularly deer and pheasants.

“The Department does not promote winter feeding and does not have a winter feeding program,” Kading said. “We recognize that many people care deeply about wildlife and it can be difficult to watch nature play out, but feeding operations, good intentions and all, can actually do more harm for wildlife than good.”

Supplemental winter feeding does not benefit entire populations, Kading said. Individual and smaller groups of animals may receive some benefit from feeding, but feeding can also result in negative consequences such as congregating animals, drawing animals in from long distances and away from good winter cover, increased predation, disease concerns, spreading of noxious weeds and feeding costs.

“Poorly conducted feeding operations can actually kill more animals than what they are intended to help,” Kading said. “For example, feeding animals on or near roadways can lead to wildlife-vehicle collisions. Providing feed such as corn, which is high in sugar and starch, can lead to acidosis, rumentis and ultimately death. And even individuals with the best of intentions, who start feeding wildlife early in winter, often end up quitting due to the amount of time and expense required, which can result in the loss of animals that become dependent on the feed.”

Wildlife rarely die from starvation in severe winters, Kading said, but it’s not uncommon for animals to die in these extreme conditions from exposure to cold weather. Therefore, Game and Fish promotes habitat development that can provide critical winter thermal cover, and food plots should be considered and planted near adequate winter cover.

“One alternative to feeding wildlife is for individuals, landowners or wildlife clubs to plow open areas of harvested grain or row crop fields to allow animals to gain access to waste grains,” Kading said. “These areas are also the first areas to melt off when we get a break in the weather.”

District Game Warden Exam Set For March 18

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department has scheduled an examination to select candidates for the position of district game warden. The test is at 10 a.m., March 18, at the department’s main office in Bismarck.

010113Game warden checking  hunters

Applicants must register to take the exam no later than March 14 by submitting an online application through the North Dakota State Job Openings website.

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and have a bachelor’s degree at time of hire (tentative hire date is June 1), have a valid driver’s license and a current North Dakota peace officer license, or be eligible to be licensed. Candidates must have excellent interpersonal skills in communications and writing, and must not have a record of any felony convictions.

District game wardens enforce game and fish laws and related regulations in an assigned district and other locations as determined by the department. Wardens normally work alone under varied conditions, at all hours of the day, night and weekends. In addition to law enforcement duties, wardens assist in the areas of public relations, education programs, and hunter and boat safety education.

Salary through training for a district game warden is $3,600 per month. Upon successful completion of training, the monthly salary ranges are $4,136 – $6,894. Wardens also receive the state benefits package, including travel allowance. Uniforms and other equipment are provided.

CWD Surveillance Continues

The State Game and Fish Department will continue its Hunter-Harvested Surveillance program during the 2015 hunting season, by sampling deer for chronic wasting disease and bovine tuberculosis from 17 units in North Dakota. In addition, all moose and elk harvested in the state are eligible for testing.

CWD testing

Samples from hunter-harvested deer taken in the western portion of the state will be tested from units 3A1, 3A2, 3A3, 3B1, 3B2, 3D1, 3D2, 3E1, 3E2, 3F1, 3F2, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 4E and 4F.

Every head sampled must have either the deer tag attached, or a new tag can be filled out with the license number, deer hunting unit and date harvested.

Hunters are encouraged to drop off deer heads at the following locations:

  • ·         Belfield – Superpumper
  • ·         Bowman – Frontier Travel Center
  • ·         Bismarck – Game and Fish Department headquarters, West Dakota Meats, Call of the Wild Taxidermy
  • ·         Crosby – Crosby Water Plant
  • ·         Dickinson – Dickinson Game and Fish district office
  • ·         Dunn Center – Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge
  • ·         Elgin – Gunny’s Bait and Tackle, Melvin’s Taxidermy
  • ·         Glen Ullin – Kuntz’s Butcher Shop
  • ·         Hazen – Hazen Meats
  • ·         Hettinger – Dakota Packing
  • ·         Kenmare – Des Lacs NWR, Lostwood NWR, Kenmare Meat Processing
  • ·         Mandan – Butcher Block Meats
  • ·         Minot – Johnson Taxidermy
  • ·         Mohall – Engebretson Processing
  • ·         New Leipzig – Hertz Hardware
  • ·         Parshall – Myers Custom Meats
  • ·         Riverdale – Riverdale Game and Fish district office
  • ·         Roseglen – Giffey Taxidermy
  • ·         Scranton – Wolf’s Processing
  • ·         Stanley – Farmer’s Union
  • ·         Washburn – Enerbase
  • ·         Williston – Williston Game and Fish district office, Mertin Kirschbaum, Scenic Sports, Bickler Taxidermy
  • ·         Wilton – Cenex.

Moose and elk heads should be taken to a Game and Fish office.

CWD affects the nervous system of members of the deer family and is always fatal. Scientists have found no evidence that CWD can be transmitted naturally to humans or livestock.

Have You Seen? Deer Disease In North Dakota

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov.
North Dakota Game and Fish wildlife veterinarian Dan Grove talks about deer diseases in North Dakota. Click here to Watch! 
And to learn more about EHD, CWD and handling safety tips visit the Game and Fish Department’s “wildlife disease” portal on thewebsite here 

<iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/xGBn-6gu7No” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

https://youtu.be/xGBn-6gu7No?t=79