Dakota Trails - North Dakota Outdoor Sports

Game Warden Exam Set for Feb. 23

Individuals interested in taking the exam to select candidates for the position of a full-time temporary district game warden must register no later than Feb. 19. The test is at 10 a.m., Feb. 23, at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s main office in Bismarck.

warden

 

Applicants must register by submitting an online application through the North Dakota State Job Openings website.

 

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and have a bachelor’s degree at time of hire (tentative hire date is May 1), have a valid driver’s license and a current North Dakota peace officer license, or be eligible to be licensed. Candidates must have excellent interpersonal skills in communications and writing, and must not have a record of any felony convictions.

 

District game wardens enforce game and fish laws and related regulations in an assigned district and other locations as determined by the department. Wardens normally work alone under varied conditions, at all hours of the day, night and weekends. In addition to law enforcement duties, wardens assist in the areas of public relations, education programs, and hunter and boat safety education.

 

Salary through training for a district game warden is $3,800 per month. For more information, see the district game warden job announcement on the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov.

Game Warden Exam Aug. 5

Individuals interested in taking the district game warden exam scheduled for Aug. 5are reminded to register no later than Aug. 1, by submitting an online application through the North Dakota State Job Openings website.

enforcement

The test is at 10 a.m. at the department’s main office in Bismarck.

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age and have a bachelor’s degree at time of hire (tentative hire date is Oct. 1), have a valid driver’s license and a current North Dakota peace officer license, or be eligible to be licensed. Candidates must have excellent interpersonal skills in communications and writing, and must not have a record of any felony convictions.

District game wardens enforce game and fish laws and related regulations in an assigned district and other locations as determined by the department. Wardens normally work alone under varied conditions, at all hours of the day, night and weekends. In addition to law enforcement duties, wardens assist in the areas of public relations, education programs, and hunter and boat safety education.

Salary through training for a district game warden is $3,800 per month. Upon successful completion of training, the monthly salary ranges are $4,260 – $7,100. Wardens also receive the state benefits package, including travel allowance. Uniforms and other equipment are provided.

Have You Seen? Operation Dry Water

 

 

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is participating in “Operation Dry Water,” a nationwide effort aimed at reducing boating while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Learn more in this week’s webcast with game warden Jackie Lundstrom.The video is here or ://gf.nd.gov/publications/television/outdoors-online-webcast.

​And if you’ve ever considered a career as a game warden, or have a friend, neighbor, son or daughter with an interest, the next game warden exam isAugust 5. Full details available right here.​ or here: http://gf.nd.gov/news/game-warden-exam-set-aug-5

Have You Seen? Transporting Fish Regulationis

 

Many are taking advantage of the open waters and beautiful spring weather to get outside and do some fishing. In this week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, district game warden Corey Erck talks about some of the North Dakota fishing regulations and about how to properly transport the fish you catch.

Watch the video right here or here: http://gf.nd.gov/publications/television/outdoors-online-webcast
Full North Dakota Fish regulations can be found right here or here http://gf.nd.gov/fishing/fishing-regulations-guide

Tennessee Man Cited for Guiding Without License

A Tennessee man has lost his hunting privileges for 18 months and was fined more than $4,000 for acting as a hunting outfitter in North Dakota without a license.

Robert “Adam” Whitten, 40, of Counce, Tenn., was charged Oct. 24, 2015, by district game warden Erik Schmidt, Linton, after Schmidt followed up on a complaint of unlawfully placed “No Hunting” signs on private property.

warden checking license

Through his investigation, Schmidt determined Whitten, who had acted as an outfitter in the past in Tennessee, was staying on a rented farmstead in southwestern Emmons County for most of the month of October. Prior to his arrival in North Dakota, Whitten took money from nonresident hunters for what he was advertising as a place to stay and access to 5,000 acres of hunting land for waterfowl and upland game.

In North Dakota it is illegal to act as a guide or outfitter without first securing a license through the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. Licensed outfitters in North Dakota are required to pass a written test, be certified in first aid, and carry liability insurance, among other requirements. The definition of outfitting in North Dakota includes providing facilities or services and receiving compensation from a third party for the use of land for the conduct of outdoor recreational activities including hunting.

Schmidt charged Whitten with two counts of outfitting without a license, both Class A misdemeanors. The maximum penalty for a Class A misdemeanors in North Dakota is a $3,000 fine and one year imprisonment.

Under a plea agreement approved by South Central District judge Thomas Schneider, Whitten was required to pay $3,325 in fines and court costs, with $1,000 suspended for a period of two years for the first count and $3,025 in fines and court costs with $1,000 suspended for a period of two years for the second count.

In addition to fines and fees, Whitten had his hunting privileges suspended for 18 months and was placed on unsupervised probation for one year. Because North Dakota is a member of the North American Wildlife Violator Compact, Whitten could potentially lose hunting privileges in other compact states.

Spring Light Goose Migration Updates

North Dakota spring light goose hunters can track general locations of geese as birds make their way through the state.

Snowgeese dickey County, 4-98photo by Craig Bihrle, ND Game and Fish

Hunters are able to call 701-328-3697 to hear recorded information 24 hours a day.Migration reports are also posted on the North Dakota Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov. Updates will be provided as migration events occur, until the season ends or geese have left the state.

North Dakota’s spring light goose season opened Feb. 20 and continues throughMay 15.

Residents must have a valid current season 2015-16 (valid through March 31) or 2016-17 (required April 1) combination license; or a small game, and general game and habitat license. The 2016-17 license is available for purchase beginning March 15.

Nonresidents need a 2016 spring light goose season license. The cost is $50 and the license is good statewide. Nonresidents who hunt the spring season remain eligible to buy a fall season license. The spring season does not count against the 14-day fall waterfowl hunting season regulation.

In addition, nonresident youth under age 16 can purchase a license at the resident fee if their state has youth reciprocity licensing with North Dakota.

Other season information, including regulations, is available by accessing the Game and Fish website.