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Salmon Spawn Completed

Fisheries crews have completed their annual salmon spawning operation on the Missouri River System, after collecting more than 1.6 million eggs.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department Missouri River System supervisor Dave Fryda said crews easily collected enough eggs to stock the 400,000 smolts planned for Lake Sakakawea in 2020.

Unlike past years, Fryda said the majority of eggs were collected from the Garrison Dam Tailrace and the Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery salmon stream instead of from Lake Sakakawea. Average size of female salmon was 6.5 pounds, which is similar to the last few years.

“The high releases through Garrison Dam this summer, which continued through the fall, resulted in extensive entrainment of salmon from Lake Sakakawea,” Fryda said. “Salmon were scarce in Lake Sakakawea during the spawning season but abundant below the dam. In fact, 94% of all eggs collected in 2019 were from below the dam.”

Annual tagging of young salmon prior to stocking allows positive confirmation that the abundant salmon found below Garrison Dam were from fish stocked in Lake Sakakawea, Fryda said.

Chinook salmon begin their spawning run in October. Since salmon cannot naturally reproduce in North Dakota, Game and Fish Department and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery personnel collect eggs and transport them to the hatchery.

Once the eggs hatch, young salmon spend several months in the hatchery before being stocked in Lake Sakakawea.

Salmon Spawn Completed

Fisheries crews completed their annual salmon spawning operation on the Missouri River System, collecting more than 2.2 million eggs.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department Missouri River System supervisor Dave Fryda said crews easily collected enough eggs to stock the 500,000 smolts planned for Lake Sakakawea in 2019.

“Salmon were very abundant throughout the run, resulting in one of the highest collection of eggs in the history of the salmon program,” Fryda said. “After Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery was filled to capacity, crews were able to collect an additional 387,000 excess eggs that were provided to Montana.”

The majority of eggs were collected from Lake Sakakawea, with help from the Missouri River below Garrison Dam. Average size of Lake Sakakawea female salmon was 6 pounds. Fryda said once again there was an abundance of young male salmon, which typically forecasts a good run the next couple years.

Additional surplus eggs were provided to South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks to help with their Lake Oahe salmon program.

Chinook salmon begin their spawning run in October. Since salmon cannot naturally reproduce in North Dakota, Game and Fish Department and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery personnel collect eggs and transport them to the hatchery.

Once the eggs hatch, young salmon spend several months in the hatchery before being stocked in Lake Sakakawea.

Salmon Spawn Completed

Fisheries crews have completed their annual salmon spawning operation on the Missouri River System after collecting more than 2.5 million eggs.

Dave Fryda, North Dakota Game and Fish Department Missouri River System supervisor, said crews easily collected enough eggs to stock the 400,000 smolts planned for Lake Sakakawea in 2018.

The majority of eggs were collected from Lake Sakakawea, with help from the Missouri River below Garrison Dam. Average size of Lake Sakakawea female salmon was 6.2 pounds, about 1.2 pounds smaller than last year. Fryda said once again there was an abundance of young male salmon, which forecasts a good run the next couple years.

Additional surplus eggs were provided to South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks to help with their Lake Oahe salmon program.

Chinook salmon begin their spawning run in October. Since salmon cannot naturally reproduce in North Dakota, Game and Fish Department and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery personnel collect eggs and transport them to the hatchery.

Once the eggs hatch, young salmon spend several months in the hatchery before being stocked in Lake Sakakawea.

Have You Seen? North Dakota Outdoors Webcast – 07/20/2017

Watch the video right here on a North Dakota  salmon update

Lake Sakakawea has some very deep, cold water that is unused by most fish, so in 1970 the Department began stocking salmon in the lake. Now, each year from about mid-July through August, anglers can enjoy some great salmon fishing in Lake Sakakawea. Learn more about the lake’s salmon and the salmon stocking program in this week’s webcast.

Have you seen? Salmon in North Dakota

 

 

You may not realize that salmon are found in the Missouri River System in North Dakota. This weeks North Dakota Outdoors Webcast updates the fall Salmon Egg Collection Update

Salmon Update

 

Find out how this year’s salmon egg collection on Lake Sakakawea went in this week’s webcast with fisheries biologist Russ Kinzler.

There’s more on salmon on our Game and Fish Department website right here

A full catalog of North Dakota Game and Fish Department video’s can be found right here

Salmon Spawn Completed

Fisheries crews have completed their annual salmon spawning operation on the Missouri River System after collecting roughly 2 million eggs.

Gwen Kreft, Gov't Buy 8-90 photo by Craig Bihrle, ND Game and Fish

Dave Fryda, North Dakota Game and Fish Department Missouri River System supervisor, said the salmon spawning season was extremely productive and crews easily collected enough eggs to stock the 400,000 smolts planned for Lake Sakakawea in 2017.

“The majority of eggs were collected from Lake Sakakawea, but the Missouri River below Garrison Dam also contributed,” Fryda said. “In addition to meeting North Dakota’s own egg goals, additional surplus eggs were provided to South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks to help with their Lake Oahe salmon program.”

Fryda said the average size of Lake Sakakawea female salmon was 7.6 pounds, about 3 pounds smaller than 2015. “The average size was smaller than the record we saw in 2015, but the overall number of salmon in the spawning run was exceptional,” he added. “Montana also had a very strong spawning run and a good egg take, but South Dakota had challenges collecting eggs this year.”

Fryda said the abundance of young male salmon, also called jacks, was again high in 2016. “Jacks are 1-year-old male salmon that become sexually mature, and typically a high abundance of these young males will forecast a good run over the next couple years,” he said.

Chinook salmon begin their spawning run in October. Since salmon cannot naturally reproduce in North Dakota, Game and Fish Department and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery personnel collect eggs and transport them to the hatchery.

Once the eggs hatch, young salmon spend several months in the hatchery before being stocked in Lake Sakakawea.

Have You Seen? North Dakota Salmon

salmon

Salmon Stocking

This weeks North Dakota Outdoors Webcast with fisheries biologist Russ Kinzler will help you learn more about the salmon fishing prospects on Lake Sakakawea this summer, and tell you how you can help with an ongoing salmon study.

 

 

You can watch the video right here: or http://gf.nd.gov/publications/television/outdoors-online-webcast

More video’s are available right here or http://gf.nd.gov/video

And more details to read about tagged salmon are right here:

Salmon Spawning Completed

Fisheries crews have completed their annual salmon spawning operation on the Missouri River System after collecting roughly 500,000 eggs.

salmon spawning ladder

Dave Fryda, North Dakota Game and Fish Department Missouri River System supervisor, said the salmon spawning season was a challenge, with almost all of the eggs taken from Lake Sakakawea. Only a few were collected from the Missouri River below Garrison Dam.

“Dropping water temperature combined with declining daylight are major cues for salmon to spawn, but water temperatures this year were slow to cool and remained among the warmest we have seen through the entire spawn,” Fryda said. “In addition, unlike past years, our staff was unable to access the emergency flood tunnels of Garrison Dam to collect salmon, which annually has been a significant source of eggs.”

Fryda said the average size of Lake Sakakawea females was 11 pounds, the largest documented since the inception of the salmon program. “The average size and condition of females was exceptional, but overall numbers were not what we expected,” he added. “South Dakota and Montana had the same challenges collecting eggs this year.”

However, Fryda said the abundance of young male salmon, also called jacks, was a bright spot. “Jacks are 1-year-old male salmon that become sexually mature, and typically a high abundance of these young males will forecast a good run over the next couple years.”

Fryda said these yearling males are from the stocking of 208,000 salmon in Lake Sakakawea in 2014. The eggs collected this fall should produce 150,000 to 200,000 salmon, and plans are to stock all of those fish in Lake Sakakawea in 2016. None are scheduled for the river below Garrison Dam, Fryda said.

Chinook salmon begin their spawning run in October. Since salmon cannot naturally reproduce in North Dakota, Game and Fish Department and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery personnel collect eggs and transport them to the hatchery.

Once the eggs hatch, young salmon spend several months in the hatchery before being stocked in Lake Sakakawea.