Dakota Trails - North Dakota Outdoor Sports

2018 Small Game, Waterfowl and Furbearer Regulations Set

North Dakota’s 2018 small game, waterfowl and furbearer regulations are set and most season structures are similar to last year.

However, one major change from last year involves Canada goose hunting zones.

The Canada goose hunting season is divided into three zones – Missouri River, western and eastern. The Missouri River Canada goose zone has the same boundary as last year, while the western zone has the same boundary as the high plains duck unit, excluding the Missouri River zone. The eastern zone has the same boundary as the low plains duck unit.

Other noteworthy items include:

  • Opening day for North Dakota residents is Sept. 22 for ducks, geese, coots and mergansers. Nonresidents may begin hunting waterfowl in North DakotaSept. 29.
  • The daily limit on pintails has increased from one to two.
  • The prairie chicken and sage grouse seasons will remain closed due to low populations.
  • In accordance with state law, nonresidents are not allowed to hunt on Game and Fish Department wildlife management areas or conservation PLOTS (Private Land Open To Sportsmen) areas from Oct. 6-12.

In addition, the state’s waterfowl, small game and furbearer regulations will have a new look this fall.

No longer printed as separate documents, North Dakota’s 2018-19 Hunting and Trapping Guide includes three main sections – upland game, migratory game bird and furbearer/trapping.

The 52-page document offers much of the same information hunters and trappers rely on, but in a much more user-friendly format. In addition, the guide also features a 4-page colored duck identification guide, aquatic nuisance species information, boating safety for hunters and Tom Roster’s Nontoxic Shot Lethality Table.

Hunters and trappers can find the guide by visiting the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Printed guides will be available at vendor locations in mid-August.

For a complete listing of opening and closing dates, and daily and possession limits, refer to the table on pages 4-5 of the guide.

Have You Seen? Upland Game Season Preview

Have you seen this week’s North Dakota Outdoors video?

Upland Game Preview

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Outdoors Online webcast previews the grouse and partridge seasons. Find out how things are shaping up with upland game management supervisor Aaron Robinson.

You can watch the video right here: or https://gf.nd.gov/ndo-webcast

 

Find out more on small game hunting at the Game and Fish Department website hunting tab right here or here: https://gf.nd.gov/hunting
More videos are available right here or http://gf.nd.gov/video

Grouse and Partridge Seasons Open Sept. 10

North Dakota’s grouse and partridge hunting seasons open Sept. 10, and hunters can expect somewhat lower bird numbers compared to 2015.

photo by Ed Bry, ND Game and Fish

Aaron Robinson, upland game management supervisor for the State Game and Fish Department, said last year’s harvest results suggest a good population heading into the 2015 fall hunting season.

“Hunters were able to find birds last year, and we are hopeful that with a little hard work this trend will continue for the 2016 fall hunting season,” Robinson said.

Harvest results for the 2015 season show more than 23,000 sharp-tailed grouse hunters (up 10 percent from 2014) harvested 83,000 birds (up 15 percent), while more than 18,000 Hungarian partridge hunters (up 13 percent) bagged 59,000 Huns (up 60 percent).

Ruffed grouse are primarily found in the native aspen woodlands of Rolette, Bottineau, Pembina, Walsh, Cavalier and portions of McHenry counties. While the ruffed grouse population remains low, Robinson said the birds are in an upward cycle and with good production an improved population is expected.

Shooting hours for the upcoming season are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. Sharptails, ruffed grouse and Huns each have a daily limit of three and a possession limit of 12.

Hunters, regardless of age, must have a fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate and general game and habitat license. In addition, hunters age 16 and older need a small game license.

For further season information and regulations, hunters should consult the North Dakota 2016-17 Small Game Hunting Guide.

2016 Small Game and Furbearer Regulations Set

North Dakota’s 2016 small game and furbearer regulations are set and most season structures are similar to last year.

grouse

Notable changes include:

The overall harvest limit on mountain lions is reduced from 21 to 15, and the early season limit is reduced from 14 to eight. If the early season ends before the season limit is reached, the season could reopen if the late season limit is reached prior toMarch 25. The late season limit is seven total lions, or three female lions, whichever comes first.

Trappers are no longer required to register with the State Game and Fish Department prior to setting cable devices.

Night vision, electronically enhanced light gathering optics and thermal imaging equipment can be used during the portion of the red fox, gray fox and coyote seasons that is open to night hunting (Nov. 21 – March 15). Spotlights or any other artificial lights are still prohibited.

Prairie chicken and sage grouse seasons will remain closed due to low populations.

In accordance with state law, nonresidents are not allowed to hunt on Game and Fish Department wildlife management areas or conservation PLOTS (Private Land Open To Sportsmen) areas from Oct. 8-14.

Hunters should refer to the North Dakota 2016-17 Small Game and Furbearer guides (available mid-August) for more details on small game and furbearer seasons. Printed waterfowl guides will be available in early September.